Sunday, May 9, 2010

















Sue Wallis, a dirty money hungry politician from Wyoming who is spearheading the push to re-open the horse slaughter plants in the USA under the guise of "caring" for horses. Sue is a breeder of quarter-horses and claims slaughter is necessary to dispose of her unwanted ones.Check out her pro-slaughter site here;
http://www.unitedorgsofthehorse.org/

EQUINE VIRAL ARTERITIS - ARGENTINA ex HOLLAND

EQUINE VIRAL ARTERITIS - ARGENTINA ex HOLLAND
*********************************************
A ProMED-mail post

ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases


Date: 8 May 2010
Source: En Mercopress.com [edited]


SENASA, Argentina's National Animal and Agriculture Health Board, has
issued a statement suspending all transportation of horses in the Buenos
Aires province for 2 weeks due to an outbreak of viral equine arteritis.

The ban, in force as of this week, may be extended up to 30 days and has
curtailed horse activities such as racing, show jumping, endurance, and
auctions. The origin of the outbreak was traced to semen imported recently
from Holland for jumpers.

The disease affects pregnant mares, which abort their embryos; however,
after being infected, they become immune. Stallions that have viral equine
arteritis must be gelded. The disease can be transmitted through the air or
during breeding.

According to the Merck Veterinary Manual, equine viral arteritis (EVA) is
an acute, contagious, viral disease of equids caused by equine arteritis
virus. It is characterized by fever, depression, dependent edema
(especially of the limbs, scrotum, and prepuce in the stallion),
conjunctivitis, nasal discharge, abortion and, infrequently, death in young
foals.

The virus which causes EVA was first isolated from horses in Ohio in 1953,
but the disease has afflicted equine animals worldwide for centuries. It
has been more common in some breeds of horses in the United States, but
there is no breed "immunity." There is no known human hazard.

--
communicated by:
ProMED-mail

[Equine viral arteritis is caused by equine arteritis virus (EAV), an RNA
virus in the genus _Arterivirus_, family Arteriviridae and order
Nidovirales. Isolates vary in their virulence and potential to induce
abortions. Only one serotype has been recognized. Limited genetic analysis
suggests that EAV strains found among donkeys in South Africa may differ
significantly from isolates in North America and Europe.

Equine arteritis virus is found in the equidae. Antibodies to this virus
have been reported in horses, ponies, donkeys, and zebras. Illness occurs
mainly among horses and ponies, but clinical signs have also been reported
in experimentally infected donkeys. EAV might also be able to cause disease
in South American camelids: polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR) detected
viral nucleic acids in an alpaca that had aborted.

Equine arteritis virus can be transmitted by the respiratory and the
venereal routes. Acutely affected horses excrete the virus in respiratory
secretions; aerosol transmission is common when horses are gathered at
racetracks, sales, shows, and other events. This virus has also been found
in urine and feces during the acute stage. It occurs in the reproductive
tract of acutely infected mares, and both acutely and chronically infected
stallions. In mares, EAV can be found in vaginal and uterine secretions as
well as in the ovary and oviduct for a short period after infection. Mares
infected late in pregnancy may give birth to infected foals. Stallions shed
EAV in semen, and can carry the virus for years. Transmission from
stallions can occur by natural service or artificial insemination. Some
carriers may eventually clear the infection. True carrier states have not
been reported in mares, geldings or sexually immature colts; however, EAV
can occasionally be found for up to 6 months in the reproductive tract of
older prepubertal colts.

Equine arteritis virus can be transmitted on fomites including equipment,
and may be spread mechanically by humans or animals. This virus is
inactivated in 20-30 minutes at 56-58 C (133-136 F), but can remain viable
for 2 to 3 days at 37-38 C (99-100 F) and for up to 75 days at 4-8 C (39-46
F). Semen remains infectious after freezing.

The incubation period varies from 2 days to 2 weeks. Infections transmitted
venereally tend to become apparent in about one week.

Most EAV infections, especially those that occur in mares bred to long-term
carriers, are asymptomatic. The clinical signs are generally more severe in
old or very young animals and in horses that are immunocompromised or in
poor condition. Fulminant infections with severe interstitial pneumonia
and/or enteritis can be seen in foals up to a few months of age. Systemic
illness also occurs in some adults. In adult horses, the clinical signs may
include fever, depression, anorexia, limb edema (particularly in the
hindlimbs), and dependent edema of the prepuce, scrotum, mammary gland
and/or ventral body wall. Conjunctivitis, photophobia, periorbital or
supraorbital edema and rhinitis can also be seen. Some horses develop
urticaria; the hives may be localized to the head or neck, but are
sometimes generalized. Abortions or stillbirths can occur in mares that are
pregnant when they are exposed. Abortions are not necessarily preceded by
systemic signs. Temporary decreases in fertility, including reduced quality
sperm and decreased libido, may be seen in stallions during the acute stage
of the disease. The decrease in sperm quality has been attributed to
increased scrotal temperature and edema, and can persist for up to 4
months. The quality of the semen is not decreased in carrier stallions.
Except in cases of severe disease in foals, deaths are rare.

Equine viral arteritis should be considered when the clinical signs include
fever, depression, edema, conjunctivitis, nasal discharges and abortions.
This disease is difficult to differentiate from other systemic and
respiratory illnesses of horses.

The differential diagnosis includes equine influenza, equine infectious
anemia, and African horse sickness, as well as infections with Getah virus,
Hendra virus, equine rhinitis A and B viruses, equine adenoviruses, and
equine herpesviruses 1 and 4. Equine viral arteritis also resembles purpura
hemorrhagica and other streptococcal infections, as well as poisoning from
the toxic plant _Berteroa incana_ (hoary alyssum).

Acutely infected horses should be isolated to prevent transmission in
secretions and excretions. Precautions should also be taken to avoid
spreading the virus on fomites. EAV is readily inactivated by detergents,
common disinfectants and lipid solvents. No specific treatment is
available; however, most healthy horses other than young foals recover on
their own. Good nursing and symptomatic treatment should be used in severe
cases. Vaccination can also help contain outbreaks.

Venereal transmission can be controlled by good management and vaccination.
To protect pregnant mares from abortion, they should be separated from
other horses and maintained in small groups according to their predicted
foaling dates. Newly acquired horses should be isolated for 3 to 4 weeks.

Vaccination appears to prevent uninfected stallions from becoming long term
carriers. Stallions that are not carriers should be vaccinated before the
start of the breeding season. Prepubertal colts are given the vaccine when
they are 6-12 months old. Carrier stallions are identified and bred only to
well vaccinated or naturally seropositive mares. Similarly, semen that
contains EAV should be used only in these mares. Because 1st time
vaccinates may shed field viruses for a short time after exposure, these
mares should be isolated from seronegative horses, particularly pregnant
mares, for 3 weeks after breeding. Naturally infected mares and those that
are not 1st time vaccinates are isolated for 24-48 hours to protect other
horses from the viruses present in semen.

Portions of this comment have been extracted from
.
- Mod.TG]

[see also:
2008
---
Equine viral arteritis - Israel (02): OIE 20081111.3547
Equine viral arteritis - Israel 20081108.3515
2007
---
Equine viral arteritis - France 20070714.2260
2006
---
Equine viral arteritis - USA (NM) (02) 20061121.3317
Equine viral arteritis - USA (NM) 20060711.1903
2005
---
Equine viral arteritis - UK: OIE 20050131.0335
2002
---
Equine viral arteritis 20020209.3523
1999
---
Equine viral arteritis - New Zealand (02) 19990805.1350
Equine viral arteritis - New Zealand 19990802.1319]

...................tg/msp/sh



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Thursday, May 6, 2010

URGENT: WNV Equine Vaccine Recall!!

WEST NILE VIRUS - USA: EQUINE VACCINE RECALL, REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
*********************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post

ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases


Date: Tue 4 May 2010
Source: ZooToo [edited]



A major pharmaceutical company has announced an "urgent recall" of all
serial numbers of its West Nile virus vaccine for horses, the American
Veterinary Medical Association [AVMA] announced on its website on Tuesday
[4 May 2010].

The recall, which was voluntary, was instigated by the drug company,
Intervet Schering-Plough, on Monday [3 May 2010], "due to an increased
number of adverse event reports associated with the use of these vaccines,"
the AVMA said.

The pharmaceutical giant has recalled all 1-dose and 5-dose vials of the
PreveNile West Nile virus vaccine for horses. "Schering Plough reported an
increased number of adverse reactions to the vaccine," said Dr Kimberly
May, assistant director of professional and public affairs at the AVMA,
"but unfortunately there were no statements as to severity, or what the
number of horses affected was."

"The word 'urgent' was in the actual letter Schering Plough had sent," Dr
May said, adding, "'Urgent' in the recall world means, 'Check your stock
right now.'"

As of late Tuesday morning [4 May 2010], Intervet Schering-Plough had not
posted a recall notice on its website, or returned a phone message from
ZooToo.com. Dr May noted that it is not unusual for companies not to post
recall information on their websites. But she said the company "has
contacted all the veterinarians affected by this, as well as the distributors."

Intervet informed the USDA and the American Association of Equine
Practitioners on Monday [3 May 2010] of its recall decision.

[byline: Gabrielle Jonas]

--
communicated by:
ProMED-mail


[More information as well as copy of the letter from Intervet
Schering-Plough may be found at the AVMA website at
.

An adverse event may be anything from swelling at the injection site,
colic, fever, or a host of other negative issues. The letter by Intervet
Schering-Plough did not specify what the adverse reactions were or what
owners and veterinarians should be on the look out for, in the event they
have already administered this vaccine. The letter from the company was
issued on 28 Apr 2010. ProMED-mail would welcome further clarification of
the number and nature of adverse events.

Currently this recall seems to be USA centric but it may be more widespread
than that. - Mod.TG]

................tg/mj/jw/sh



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ProMED-mail makes every effort to verify the reports that
are posted, but the accuracy and completeness of the
information, and of any statements or opinions based
thereon, are not guaranteed. The reader assumes all risks in
using information posted or archived by ProMED-mail. ISID
and its associated service providers shall not be held
responsible for errors or omissions or held liable for any
damages incurred as a result of use or reliance upon posted
or archived material.
************************************************************
Donate to ProMED-mail. Details available at:

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Visit ProMED-mail's web site at .
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Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Canadas' "Finest" Horse-Slaughter Plants: Where the Associations "Un-Wanted" Horses Go....

Click on title above to see horrific under-cover footage;


http://unnecessaryevils.blogspot.com/2010/03/canadas-finest-slaughter-plants-where.html

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Friday, February 5, 2010

American Quarter Horse Association blames non-existent “ban” for the consequences of its own policy

February 5, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


CHICAGO, (EWA) – On February 4th the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) posted a release issued by the Animal Welfare Council (AWC) claiming that “experts” warned of current issues facing the horse industry if slaughter was ended. Reminiscent of past years, the AQHA is again promoting disinformation in the hope the American public will trust them for their good name.

The refusal to address the excess breeding of horses over the years has caught up with slaughter proponents. Once again, they find themselves scrambling to find scapegoats for a problem they created. Driven by the quest for registration fees, the AQHA has promoted overbreeding for decades as they have built their ever expanding empire worldwide.

The release revives the myth of the “unintended consequences” by claiming “experts” warned of a negative impact on horse welfare if slaughter was ended.

Not only has horse slaughter not ended but in 2008, the first full year after the US plants closed, the “unintended consequences” resulted in the second highest slaughter count since 1995.

“There is nothing stopping anyone from sending their horse to slaughter.” said Equine Welfare Alliance’s (EWA), John Holland. Blaming the closure of the plants for excess horses from an organization that alone brags of registering in excess of 135,000 foals every year, is hypocritical.

According to the USDA, the leading breed on the slaughter trucks are Quarter Horses, yet in 2008, AQHA’s former executive vice president, Bill Brewer, warned of a pending horse “shortage” and suggested offering incentives to increase breeding.

The release builds on the “imaginary ban” by stating that horses are at forty percent of their value since the plants closed. EWA’s Vicki Tobin asks the AQHA and AWC, “In the face of the greatest economic downturn since the 1930s, are home values, retirement funds and other assets that have decreased in value due to the closure of the slaughter plants?”

The release questions the lack of funding in the federal horse protection legislation, HR 503/S 727. Not stated is why the government should be responsible for privately owned horses or a breeder’s choice to breed more than they can sell.

Beginning in July, US horses must comply with European Union (EU) drug regulations. This critical issue impacts human food safety and yet, it was not mentioned. American horses are not tracked or considered food animals by any US government agency and routinely receive medications that are banned by the EU. Equine welfare advocates have been warning of the drug issue for years.

Combined with the drug compliance, the current downturn in international demand for horse meat will further exacerbate the issue.

A study released by EWA members in 2008 concluded with a warning of exactly what is occurring today, “Abuse and neglect is largely determined by economic conditions. …As of the end of the study period, abuse and neglect did not appear to have exceeded norms for the baseline year of 2006, but to the extent that the economic conditions continue to deteriorate, this trend may become more worrisome in the months to come.”

Meanwhile, the AWC, AQHA and slaughter proponents continue to blame “activists” for the “unwanted” horses that they are responsible for producing every year.

The Equine Welfare Alliance is a dues free, umbrella organization with over 95 member organizations. The organization focuses its efforts on the welfare of all equines and the preservation of wild equids.

Click on title above to visit EWAs site;
www.equinewelfarealliance.org